Most efficient way to heat my home?

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Re: Most efficient way to heat my home?

Postby Gordon-Loomberah » Sun Dec 13, 2015 10:59 am

The results from blowing a fan over a "radiator" are astounding too ;) You get significantly more heat from them rather than just relying on convection. That sort of radiator, and the same applies to thermaskirt, doesn't actually radiate much heat at all, most of the heat transfer is via convection. You need high temperatures like an electric bar radiator if you want significant radiant heat.
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Re: Most efficient way to heat my home?

Postby builder » Mon Dec 14, 2015 11:06 am

please follow link to report. you will be pleasantly surprised :o

http://www.discreteheat.com/downloads/t ... report.pdf
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Re: Most efficient way to heat my home?

Postby builder » Mon Dec 14, 2015 11:11 am

if you don't want to read the whole report this is the conclusion of the report

"5. Conclusions
In this study the authors have investigated the thermal performance
of hydronic radiant baseboards. The main goal was to design
a reliable equation for prediction of heat output per unit length of
the baseboard. Based on the obtained results the following can be
concluded:
 The heat outputs predicted by the proposed equation (Eq. (9))
were in close agreement with the previous experimental
investigation. Therefore the proposed equations can be used
with confidence for system design in practice.
 A doubling of the water flow through the investigated baseboards
would increase the total heat emission by only 4.5%. It
was therefore recommended to use the current guideline value
of 100 Pa/m for water-side pressure loss for the system design.
 Calculations showed that heat emission per unit length from
radiant baseboards increased by approximately 2.1% per centimeter
of height. It is therefore suggested to use radiant baseboards
of maximum possible height if this heating system is to
be operated at supply water temperatures below 45 C.
 Because of their installation flexibility and discreet finish,
radiant baseboards can be used both in new-built and in retrofitted
buildings. Either as the sole or as an additional heat distributing
system.
 Radiant baseboards should not be used in rooms with small wall
perimeter and high heating demand.
Acknowledgements
Financial support from the Swedish Energy Agency and Swedish
Construction Development Fund (SBUF) is gratefully acknowledged.
The authors also wish to thank Armin Halilovic for his help
with mathematical modeling and company DiscreteHeat for the
technical support."
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Re: Most efficient way to heat my home?

Postby Gordon-Loomberah » Mon Dec 14, 2015 11:54 am

It was a bit tl;dr the whole thing, but I did read a bit more than that ;)
However, they were only comparing with small conventional radiators (which mine isn't).

I think this: " Radiant baseboards should not be used in rooms with small wall
perimeter and high heating demand." is very telling- you can't get a lot of heat out of them. They rely on low output/area over a large area. The radiators they were comparing them with suffer the same problem - you'd need a stack of them for comparable heating output. Blowing a fan over a modern high surface area a radiator can output a huge amount of heat, I think mine is rated at 2.4kW for 60C water, without fan assistance, ie just relying on convection. The fan increases that output significantly, but I can't specify an exact amount, as I haven't measured water in and out temperatures and flow rates to come up with the actual kW rating.

Sure, radiant baseboards will no doubt work very well in well insulated homes where you have rooms large enough for sufficient length of radiant baseboards, particularly suited when there is not much spare wall space, but it may not be the most ecomical solution for everyone.
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Re: Most efficient way to heat my home?

Postby australsolarier » Thu Dec 17, 2015 4:59 pm

the costs for hydronic solar heating system upfront are much larger than for a heatpump. my hydronic heating system works most of the time for me. between 16 and 42 days per winter i need wood backup. they also need somewhat more maintenance, like clearing airlocks, sedimentation of some parts. they also need cooling device in the summer as you are not very likely to use the heat inside the house. maybe for a pool. or a fruit dryer etc.
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Re: Most efficient way to heat my home?

Postby Gordon-Loomberah » Thu Dec 17, 2015 5:54 pm

australsolarier wrote:they also need cooling device in the summer...


Or a cover, I use shadecloth.
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Re: Most efficient way to heat my home?

Postby australsolarier » Thu Dec 17, 2015 6:01 pm

yes, then you are at work.
you forget doing it.
the wind blows it off
etc

i use the heat in the solar spacing tanks to tide me over on cloudy days for the domestic hot water. so it is handy to have that amount of hot water ready. my cooling works by diverting the circulation of the heat pipes through a rain water tank. so it slows down harvesting hot water, but at the same time keeps the temperature in tank at the programmed maximum (78 degrees in summer, 82 winter, but never really gets there in winter)
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