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INSULATION OF PIPING

PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:10 am
by JohnB
Specification J5.4 , table 2a of BCA requires (among other things) that all cold water pipes are insulated and provides minimum R values for the insulation depending on climate zone, capacity of the cooling system and location of pipes.
Why cold water pipes (and refrigeration pipes as well) installed in NSW climate zone 1, 2, 3, and 5 (representing moderate climate conditions) are required to have heavier insulation (Rmin=1.2 for external pipes for smaller systems) than pipes installed in more harsh, hotter conditions in zones 4, 6, 7 and 8 (Rmin = 0.8 for external pipes for smaller systems).
If someone knows the answer, please let me know. This question bugs me for some time now.
JohnB

Re: INSULATION OF PIPING

PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 12:03 pm
by variflex
Personally I think it's a great idea to insulate the cold water pipes,
I live in an older house, approx 25 years old,on a summers day I can turn the cold tap on and it's nearly steaming, then one has to run the tap for a good minute or two for the water to cool which is alot of wastage and is what i assume the insulation is there to eliminate

Re: INSULATION OF PIPING

PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 12:20 pm
by Clemo
I'm no plumber but typically cold water pipes are insulated to stop them freezing in areas with sub zero winter temps.

Re: INSULATION OF PIPING

PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 2:41 pm
by JohnB
Just to clarify. I am referring to cold (chilled) water pipes or refrigeration pipes installed in NSW climatic conditions. Not in sub-zero conditions and not potable water installations.
Cheers
JohnB

Re: INSULATION OF PIPING

PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 2:45 pm
by Clemo
Condensation

Re: INSULATION OF PIPING

PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 3:12 pm
by JohnB
Not a bad suggestion Clemo.
Poor insulation in humid climate may result in condensation on the surface.
Is it the reason though for BCA requirements?.
Could we get second opinion please.
JohnB

Re: INSULATION OF PIPING

PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 7:50 pm
by Tracker
JohnB wrote:Why cold water pipes (and refrigeration pipes as well) installed in NSW climate zone 1, 2, 3, and 5

I have not pondered the subject for any more than five seconds, but surely it's heat loss 1, 2, and 3.
Condensation is a symptom of heat loss, but could be consider a serious nuisance.
What is the point of thinking energy efficiency and then lose ANY energy.

This sounds more like a homework question for a TAFE course !
:lol:
..
.

Re: INSULATION OF PIPING

PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:48 pm
by JohnB
Thanks Tracker for your contribution. I do agree that it is about heat loss (or to be more precise in the case of chilled water or refrigeration pipes - heat gain).
The question was different though.
It was in short, why the rules of BCA recommend THICKER insulation for cold pipes in temperate climate zones (1,2,3 and 5) than in hotter zones (4, 6, 7 and 8).
Let's just focus on this question, please.
Cheers
JohnB

Re: INSULATION OF PIPING

PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 4:12 pm
by Tracker
JohnB wrote:why the rules of BCA recommend THICKER insulation for cold pipes in temperate climate zones (1,2,3 and 5) than in hotter zones (4, 6, 7 and 8).


Clearly, you would have to ask THEM why it is so..
Considering what we know, there on absolutely NO reason why it should be thicker. I could almost argue that it should be thicker in Very Hot climates and Very Cold climates and less thick in Temperate ones.

I suspect that someone just was not thinking, and therefor, only THEY, the BCA, can rationalise their rules..

Best of luck.
..
.

Re: INSULATION OF PIPING

PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 7:21 pm
by bpratt
variflex wrote:Personally I think it's a great idea to insulate the cold water pipes,
I live in an older house, approx 25 years old,on a summers day I can turn the cold tap on and it's nearly steaming, then one has to run the tap for a good minute or two for the water to cool which is alot of wastage and is what i assume the insulation is there to eliminate


Same situation here, and on top of water wastage there's the issue of the water pump running to get that hot 'cold' water out of the pipes and the drinkable cold water through to the tap.

That means electricity being used to pump hot water out of the cold water tap, and water pumps aren't known to be the cheapest thing to run. :(