Making the most of your Feed In Tarriff

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Making the most of your Feed In Tarriff

Postby moemoke » Mon Nov 16, 2009 11:44 am

I got a memo from my PV Solar installer giving a few hints on how to make the most
with the new 60c feed in tarriff. I hadn't thought about this but it does make sense.
His advice was to leave any tasks that require electricity to wait until the PV's are not
feeding power into the grid so wait until late evening or night time before you do any
clothes washing, drying, ironing, using the oven (if elec) and there a probably others.

The idea is that this will maximise your feed in power, which you should get 60 cents a kw
and you are using grid power at around 20 cents per kw or a lot less if you can wait till late
in the night and do your tasks with off peak power.

Any thoughts
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Re: Making the most of your Feed In Tarriff

Postby munter » Mon Nov 16, 2009 11:53 am

That approach makes sense if you are living under a net feed in tariff but I think the time of your own use does not matter under a gross feed in tariff. I thought a Gross Fit was supposed to pay you for all production whether used on site or not.

Regardless - I think it is a very valid point to think about how best to manage your domestic usage depending on what sort of tariff regime you are working under. Time of use metering is another area where people can actively manage their usage to achieve a better outcome than users who do not manage their consumption.
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Re: Making the most of your Feed In Tarriff

Postby franks » Wed Nov 18, 2009 10:07 am

Good news for NSW residents its now a Gross feed in Tariff,should allow you to use power any time
Also the time PVs work at there best (Sunny Hot long summer Days) is the period of max demand from the power generators.
So all you Grid PV owners your doing all us a favor, when all the aircons are running :) making the Grid that little bit stronger :)
3.04kW Grid Tie system 16 of 190W PVs, Samil 3.3kW
3.8kW PV Stand Alone Off Grid.. 5-8kWHr Per day
24 of 190W PVs
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8 of 6V 600 AH flooded cells (24 volt 1200 AH)
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Re: Making the most of your Feed In Tarriff

Postby SR76 » Tue Nov 24, 2009 12:49 am

That's kind of what I do, in a way... though I'd be stoked to be getting 60c/kWh for it!

Over in WA we are able to use "SmartPower" (the time-of-use tariff) with grid-feed PV. I don't think many other states / utilities allow this - but then remember we have woeful government action on ANY kind of feed-in tariff anyway.

In summer (Oct-Mar) the rates are currently:

Peak (11am-5pm weekdays) 31.97c/kWh
Weekday shoulder (7am-11am and 5pm-9pm weekdays) 19.50 c/kWh
Weeekend shoulder (7am-9pm weekends) 14.31 c/kWh
Off Peak (9pm-7am any day) 9.12 c/kWh

So... I try and use as little as possible during peak hours and save up whatever high-power tasks I can until the cheaper times. I run my dishwasher at night, save clothes washing, ironing and vaccuming until the weekends and set the timer on the electric-boost HWS to early morning (in Winter when it's needed).

In 52 days since the start of October I have exported 197 peak units and imported... one.
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Re: Making the most of your Feed In Tarriff

Postby emike » Tue Feb 23, 2010 1:29 pm

Any thoughts on laptop computers? Now I know they do not use much power, but if you use the battery for a while you are not using mains power for that period of use. However when the battery dies and you switch on the mains does the laptop use twice the amount of power as it is charging the batteries as well. Is there any advantage in using the battery as against the mains?

Apologies if this is not the correct thread but appears to be the most appropriate - maximising ones pv output.

Ta

Mike
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Re: Making the most of your Feed In Tarriff

Postby terryw » Tue Feb 23, 2010 2:03 pm

A great idea. Similar thinking to the smart power program which we here in the west (no Feed-in tarrif, though) have access to. Essentially, it has different rates for power during the day...including Peak, off peak, shoulder. This means that in any household on smart power you should do all major power jobs after 9pm where unit cost of power is down to 7c. from a peakperiod rate of 30c. If you have a solar array and feeding into the grid then your feed in is at the increased rate...so you get paid 30c/unit for power produced during the peak period rather than the standard rate of less than 20c. By careful management of power consumption times, and an efficient solar array, our household of three adults is permanently in credit with our energy provider.
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Re: Making the most of your Feed In Tarriff

Postby munter » Tue Feb 23, 2010 4:08 pm

emike - probably deserves it's own thread but to answer your question, using a laptop is generally more power efficient than a desktop. There are some losses when you charge and discharge the battery but these are usually smaller than the difference between a laptop and a desktop. For reference, our core2 15.4in laptop uses between 25-30W in regular use while our desktop would chew through 180W completing similar tasks. We use the laptop primarily and have the PC switched off at the wall to ensure that the standby power consumption is also minimised.
My Delll Mini 9 uses even less power (<15 W from memory) but the screen is so small that working on it for long periods gives a bit of eye strain.
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Re: Making the most of your Feed In Tarriff

Postby SR76 » Tue Feb 23, 2010 4:48 pm

There is also the matter of batery life, though, and if you choose to cycle the battery unnecessarily then I suggest you might ultimately pay for it another way.

-SR
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Re: Making the most of your Feed In Tarriff

Postby PeterC » Thu Mar 04, 2010 12:45 pm

SR76 wrote:That's kind of what I do, in a way... though I'd be stoked to be getting 60c/kWh for it!

Over in WA we are able to use "SmartPower" (the time-of-use tariff) with grid-feed PV. I don't think many other states / utilities allow this - but then remember we have woeful government action on ANY kind of feed-in tariff anyway.

That is an interesting way to do it. In the ACT we can optionally have time of use metering, peak/shoulder/offpeak times with no difference for season or daylight saving or weekends. The feedin tariff is gross at 50c/KWh (though possibly dropping to 37c from July if the minister follows draft recommendations). Consequently the feed in is entirely decoupled from consumption. I could consume all my power just in peak time or just in off peak time and it would make no difference to the feed in credit line on my bill.
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Re: Making the most of your Feed In Tarriff

Postby Inspector » Thu Mar 04, 2010 7:52 pm

A suggestion I think I've already mentioned in another thread?

While gross metering is available, some customers aren't elligible for it... This recommendation is for those customers who have three-phase power:

Make sure the solar installer connects the inverter to the phase which uses the least amount of power during the day (a simple "tong test" will tell him which one this is). That way, you will be using less of the generated electricity before it gets to the meter. I inspected one job last year when the customer had a 3-phase meter, but only 2 phases were connected. I suggested he get the installer back to rearrange the wiring so that the only "load" connected to the buy-back phase was the solar inverter, then he would've got gross metering on his net meter without having to make any other changes...

Edit: I've since learned that the meter doesn't like this. Too bad I can't remember what job it was :)
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