Impact of shift to DST on TOU

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Impact of shift to DST on TOU

Postby FarmerJohn » Mon Oct 06, 2014 8:46 am

I am in NSW.

Having voluntarily switched to time of use metering, because I do most of my consuming at night and at weekends I had a TOU meter installed. It measures peak, shoulder, off-peak and export. Even though it meters export I never got around doing that - I have nothing solar grid connected.

It has a little button on it and you can use that to scroll through the readings (I write them down every two weeks).

On the NSW RESIDENTIAL Energy Price Fact Sheet it defines the peak and shoulder periods with the footnote:

All times are AEST, unless you have an interval meter, in which case daylight savings time will apply if relevant.

In NSW Peak and Shoulder are billed the same and my concern is identifying the times for off-peak which is the only time I want to use grid power, so it is critical for me to know when this starts and ends and now I am very confused.

1) Do I have an interval meter - what is that and how can I tell?

2) Does "if relevant" in the above quote mean when we are in DST? On re-reading I think I am overthinking this and this is the meaning :)

Seems like this all revolves around if I have an interval meter. If I knew what one of those was I would probably not have a problem - looking at the word literally it sounds to me like something to measure intervals and I am not sure that is what we are doing here.
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Re: Impact of shift to DST on TOU

Postby Tracker » Mon Oct 06, 2014 9:27 am

..
It is a quandary that MANY have asked, INCLUDING me..

I understand an INTERVAL meter to e one that records power used in defined intervals.. ie.. 1/2Hr

So your meter will have to be an interval meter..

Now - if you check the time on the meter, it will not\w be an hour out, but I "Understand" that the computer program that interprets the data recorded from the meter, adjust the time for DS..

What one does need to do, is to adjust any usage clocks, eg. Off-Peak HW.. for DST, and you have just reminded me that I had forgotten such, myself.... :cry:

So, I hope that your answer is that you need do nothing, other than adjust any clocks that you use, to DST..

In NSW Peak and Shoulder are billed the same ....

except if you have Solar Feed-In, and then the mongrels change PEAK to more like 50c.
OffPeak=12c.... Shoulder=23c... PEAK=50c (or there abouts)
Interestingly, I have a friend who "DEMANDED" that he be left on the old tariff, and they agreed.. :shock:
..
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Re: Impact of shift to DST on TOU

Postby davidg » Mon Oct 06, 2014 11:26 am

FarmerJohn wrote:In NSW Peak and Shoulder are billed the same and my concern is identifying the times for off-peak which is the only time I want to use grid power, so it is critical for me to know when this starts and ends and now I am very confused.

Call the retailer, ask for the details, GET IT IN WRITING. Call back the following day do the same again.

-----

The default for me and most of Victoria. :? Unless the retailers specifically say otherwise, DST makes no difference to TOU it continues on EST so you need to alter when you do things by one hour.
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Re: Impact of shift to DST on TOU

Postby Tracker » Mon Oct 06, 2014 12:27 pm

..
and if you are as distrusting as I am, then you could ensure a safety margin..
eg. if the normal Off-Peak is say 2200 to 0700,
then actual usage from 2300 to 0600 could cover ALL bases... ( Have I worked out DST properly :oops: )
..
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Re: Impact of shift to DST on TOU

Postby gki78789 » Wed Oct 15, 2014 12:21 pm

Farmer John,

I have gone to ToU voluntary in NSW (Endeavour Energy region) and my ToU correctly changes the time for daylight saving on the day it takes place. I've watched my register read correctly the load I was using at the time and it is correct. I have EM1000 (or EM1200) meter with an orange button to scroll the readings - usually, date, time, Peak, Shoulder, OffPeak, Export, and two other stationary numbers that don't change.

Interval means that the meter records energy use (kWh) every 30 mins and then writes that value in memory (usually for $ revenue and refers to the tariff on the ToU table). So, at the end of the 90 days, there would be 4320 recordings to work out the total kWh used but will be broken up for the different tariffs for the billing system to collate the final readings and bill accordingly (I have 4 different registers for each other tariffs plus export for solar all in one meter). The main reason for interval reading is that the meter does not need to have large memory storage. By collating it every 30 minutes, reducing memory storage by at least 30 times. Usually, the meter should be able to store 1 years worth in case there are missed readings. I think by law, the meter must be read at least once a year. Some providers allow customer to submit their own readings (e.g. rural areas). The meter reading will always even out since it's a cumulative meter, so if one misread the meter, the next meter read will result in a lower or higher bill depending on the last reading. But you never end up paying more because of previous bad read - the meter is always cumulative. The only time it would be a problem if the meter was reset to 0 by choice or fault, then you would not know how much was used.

Some people say that you can cheat the meter by turning on a big load for less than a minute thinking that meter doesn't record at intervals. It doesn't work like that. It still records total energy used in 30 minutes regardless of load size, then summarises it. Otherwise the meter would need to have very large memory storage to store 90 days worth of readings. Interval readings reduce the amount of memory in the digital meters required to store the counters. It'd be like a water meter, it doesn't matter how much pressure is used (tap), it still returns the volume. Energy is different to reading power - people get this confused. Electrical Energy is power used over time which is kWh. Power is work required to perform a task, eg. 2400watts to boil water in a 2litre kettle. If it takes 2 minutes to boil the water, then energy = 0.080kWh or 80watthours. Big difference saying 2400 watts vs 80 watthours.

I've had mine over 12 months now, and it's pretty spot on. I do collect the readings once a week just for my records and peace of mind. But it's not distrusting of the energy provider. Just for me to monitor my own energy usage on a weekly basis. I would like to get a smart meter this means one does not need to the meter box, you can get it remotely.
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