School Project on creating an energy source in Mekong Delta

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School Project on creating an energy source in Mekong Delta

Postby SimpleJack » Wed Mar 14, 2012 1:50 pm

We chose to do wind power:

We planned on using a similar set up to this guy http://www.mdpub.com/Wind_Turbine/

We were also informed that the citizens of Mekong Delta, Vietnam have trouble with sewage in rivers so close to their house so we were considering using the energy created by the wind turbine to pump the sewage somewhere else.

Would pumping the sewage underground be a good idea or would we have to try contact the closest waste treatment plant?

They would be using the electricity to power a stove this is an excerpt from our design brief: 'the Mekong Delta has good electricity coverage, with approximately 80 – 90% of households being connected to the grid, and most people have access to natural gas canisters for cooking. However they still face the global problem of making energy usage sustainable. In the long term, a sustainable energy solution will need to be developed which is appropriate to the environment of the Mekong Delta region. Sustainable energy usage can be achieved in many ways, and result in immediate benefits which compound over time; consider ways to improve household energy efficiency (e.g. insulation, efficient stoves), or harvest cheap renewable energy (e.g. solar, biomass, wind)'

We found that Vietnam goes through a monsoon season that has winds that we could harness for a power source.

If anyone has any advice, and could explain whether our idea will or wont work this would be much appreciated
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Re: School Project on creating an energy source in Mekong Delta

Postby Gordon-Loomberah » Thu Mar 15, 2012 3:14 pm

SimpleJack wrote:We planned on using a similar set up to this guy http://www.mdpub.com/Wind_Turbine/


I read through the whole article and there was not one mention of how much power it actually produced, the low voltage readings indicate to me that it probably isn't very much.
Sure you might do it as a school project, but I would not be relying on it to produce much in the way of usable power. Also, the plastic blades look very flimsy with no structural strength, and liable to snap in strong wind or due to vibration (as they did on the turbine on the web page), so it could not really be considered safe to be near when there was much wind. You certainly would not want it anywhere near the school grounds.

We were also informed that the citizens of Mekong Delta, Vietnam have trouble with sewage in rivers so close to their house so we were considering using the energy created by the wind turbine to pump the sewage somewhere else.


Good luck with that! You really wont have enough power to run a pump of any useful size.

Would pumping the sewage underground be a good idea


To pollute the underground water? I dont think so! In any case, you dont need a pump, just a hole. Gravity does the work.


They would be using the electricity to power a stove


Honestly, it's just not going to work with electricity from that wind turbine. A much better project, with far greater chance of success, would be to build a solar oven/stove.
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Re: School Project on creating an energy source in Mekong Delta

Postby Tracker » Fri Mar 16, 2012 9:34 am

SimpleJack wrote:We were also informed that the citizens of Mekong Delta, Vietnam have trouble with sewage in rivers so close to their house

If you ever have the opportunity to travel to Asia, you will typically find homes with their kitchens, built on stilts over the local river..
At one end of the structure, they wash their vegetables in the river, and at the other end, is their toilet, straight into the river..

There are a great many projects around the world, attempting to help the third world, and that is apart from extermination via tailored wars. :o

Most of those projects attempt to get CLEAN water to the homes, so any attempt to provide filtering methods and sterilisation, would be a great help.. eg.. Solar Kettle???
Did you see the African project where they used a series of sand-filled jars to slowly filter the bio-mass from local waters.. At least they started with substantially CLEAR water..
If energy was needed, then surely SOLAR power would be far better than WIND, as there is minimal maintenance with SOLAR, but WIND requires considerable maintenance, and the generators have a limited life..
The only unknown is the extent of local Asian-Smog, that would limit the usefulness of Solar-Projects.

Like the many other areas being assisted, the best help would be to drill wells and provide pumping facilities.
The odd thing is that for tens of years, Australia was watered via wind-driven pumps.. Why do we not see them any more??

PS - Generating electricity from wind and then using that electricity to pump or do something else , mechanical, is VERY inefficient.. Direct application of the wind to a mechanical pump would be more efficient.
As far as self-sufficiency is concerned, SOLAR-ELECTRICITY via batteries would provide uninterrupted lighting to the homes concerned... That would have to be a plus...
Canister gas (whilst expensive) is the least polluting cooking solution.
I suspect that batteries of sufficient size to be useful, and the Panels and Inverters needed to power a home, would be WAY beyond the capacity of the users to ever pay for, let alone maintain..
..
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Re: School Project on creating an energy source in Mekong Delta

Postby Gordon-Loomberah » Fri Mar 16, 2012 10:40 am

[OT]
Tracker wrote:The odd thing is that for tens of years, Australia was watered via wind-driven pumps.. Why do we not see them any more??


You dont get out of the city very often, do you? ;)
There are still plenty of windmills in use, but when they are eventually beyond viable/economic repair, they are usually replaced with electric pumps, powered either via solar or mains electricity.
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Re: School Project on creating an energy source in Mekong Delta

Postby Tracker » Fri Mar 16, 2012 12:32 pm

Gordon-Loomberah wrote:[OT]There are still plenty of windmills in use,

Indeed, you are right.. I can't think of having seen a working wind-pump for a very long time.
Maybe those close to the roads , have all be shot up, anyway.... :lol:

I don't think it OT at all, because it shows that the technology WORKS and must still be fairly readily available..

Of paramount importance with any of these "Third-World" projects, is for the bulk of the process to be obtained locally, so that the entire community benefits..
eg.
The stone-jar water filters - made work for local folk to produce the jars.. You could even semi-automate the process via Solar Panels and a small pump, keeping each jar full..

It annoys me that teachers encourage kids to think of the impractical, when the practical is achievable..
..
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