Turning off power point question

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Turning off power point question

Postby leolights » Wed Mar 19, 2014 10:06 am

Hey guys,

I know that turning off from the wall power point saves some energy but does this method work the same with those multi cord inputs? (not sure what they're called - those things where you plug multiple cords in and it receives electricity through one cord).

My question is, since most of these in my house have their on/off switch, would turning it off by switch be the same as turning it off by the actual wall power point in the context of energy saving?

For example, the multi cord inputs is switch off, but the main cord is still plugged into the wall in the in the on position.

Is it more efficient to turn it the power off from the wall socket or is turning it off from its own power button be sufficient enough to save energy?

Thank you
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby Warpspeed » Wed Mar 19, 2014 11:13 am

Yes.
Switching off the mains supply to many types of modern appliance externally can sometimes save a little energy.
The on/off switch on some electronic appliances often leaves some internal parts still functioning and drawing a small amount of continuous power. But not always.

Switching it off at the wall, unplugging it, or switching off at a multiple outlet distribution board guarantees off really means completely off.
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby Smurf1976 » Wed Mar 19, 2014 6:52 pm

To save power, any means that cuts power to the appliance "at the plug" will do the job. Turning off the power point, or turning off the switch on a power board, either will do it. If in doubt then simply try to turn the appliance on in the usual manner via the remote control or switch on the appliance - if it has no power then it's properly "off" and not using any power.

If however you wish to protect against the risk of lightning strike, or if you are going to open the device up and do some work on it and don't want to be electrocuted, then simply turning a switch off is NOT sufficient protection. You MUST physically unplug it in this case, no exceptions. Reason being that normal switches will not withstand a lightning strike, may not stop a major surge, and do not always disconnect both the Active and Neutral conductors (disconnecting only the Active). As such, they are a means of stopping the flow of power under normal circumstances, but should never be relied upon as a safety device where there's a risk of electric shock etc if it fails. ALWAYS pull the plug out in this case, always. :)
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby leolights » Wed Mar 19, 2014 7:26 pm

Thanks for the info guys! :)
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby dinkum » Wed Mar 19, 2014 8:03 pm

g'day,leo......,from my experience [and out of neccesitity once] i think it pays to turn off as many appliances of as you can . from what i've read in alternative magazines you can save up to 20% but more likely 5-10% in power ,even our washing machine uses power when not used,our cyclic fridge uses 15-18 watts when not running,but obviously you can't turn fridge off.??? any input on this one anybody....dennis.
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby Helipos » Wed Mar 19, 2014 8:24 pm

I know my computer uses 16 watts when off. What the hell for I have no idea.
The worst appliances Ive read about was a TV that consumed 50 watts when off.

So yeah it all helps
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby Cherokee Solar » Thu Mar 20, 2014 7:31 am

Hi Leo,

Go hard and switch them all off - or as many as you can! :D

It is good practice if you are considering going off grid at any time in the future too. ;)

Plus best of all it saves you money. How can you stick it to the man when you leave the TV on standby? :lol:

The house here uses only approximately 27Wh (60% of that is the inverter) when everything is off. It is amazing how many items are switched on even then: Refrigerator; smoke alarms; x2 pumps; and a weather station. Everything else gets switched off at the wall. It just becomes a habit after a while. ;)
Off grid solar + hot water. Heavily insulated + owner built flamezone house BAL-FZ. 300 mixed fruit trees + herbs + flowers + vegetables. Bees + heritage chickens. High up in the mountains north of Melbourne. http://ferngladefarm.blogspot.com.au/
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby Warpspeed » Thu Mar 20, 2014 7:39 am

dinkum wrote:g'day,leo......,from my experience [and out of neccesitity once] i think it pays to turn off as many appliances of as you can . from what i've read in alternative magazines you can save up to 20% but more likely 5-10% in power ,even our washing machine uses power when not used,our cyclic fridge uses 15-18 watts when not running,but obviously you can't turn fridge off.??? any input on this one anybody....dennis.

I went around the entire house measuring the "off" power consumtion of every single item, it was a real eye opener. And there is a lot you can do fairly easily.

The first stunner was a pair of 240 volt electric wall clocks 60mA each (14.4 watts) 0.346 Kwh/day EACH !
They went straight into the wheelie bin quick smart, to be replaced by battery wall clocks. One AA batery lasts at least a year.
Next I found a whole bunch of plug packs around the house powering various things, the old transformer type that always run quite warm. These were replaced with the new smaller cold running switched power supply type.

Like Dennis I had a laptop computer gobbling up around 15 watts, even when the battery was fully charged.
I fitted a digital appliance timer to that so power only comes on to recharge the battery once per week for one hour which is just sufficient for the "fully charged" green LED to light on the laptop after about 45 minutes.
If I need to give the laptop a serious workout I just bypass the timer.

I discovered my old CRT computer monitor that runs maybe 10 hours per day drew 420 watts. That went out onto the nature strip, to be replaced by an LCD display 48 watts running, about 6 watts standby.
There was plenty more.... But you get the general idea.

Likewise with a 25 year old refrigerator.

By being totally ruthless I have been able to just about halve my total power consumption, and the newer replacement appliances I bought were all secondhad and not that expensive. Its been a great learning experience.
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby leolights » Thu Mar 20, 2014 11:59 am

Quite painful to know that I have left unnecessary appliances running for so much of my life haha. Now i just have to make sure the others in the house follow :lol: Thanks for the replies again guys, have a good one!
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby Benny » Thu Mar 20, 2014 7:49 pm

To see if you have "significant" standby power its also useful to use the utility meter. Turn fridge off temporarily and look at the meter. Read the meter specs - clock type could be 266.6revs per kWh, digital 1 flash per Wh. Time the revs of the clock type or flash time on digital. Convert to W and thats your total standby.
1W of standby here in WA where we pay 26c/kWh costs $2 per year. If the cost is high, then start looking at whats using the standby by doing the audit as described above.
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