Turning off power point question

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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby Smurf1976 » Thu Mar 20, 2014 9:52 pm

Quite apart from the cost and CO2 emissions there is also the question of appliance lifespan and safety.

Which appliance is most likely to catch fire at home?

Dryer? Toaster? Heater? Oven? Kettle? Iron?

Nope, it's the washing machine! And the fires invariably start in the electronics not the motor etc. So there's a damn good reason to turn the thing off when not actually being used. Computer monitors and TV's are also pretty high up the list of things you'd expect to be safe but which aren't so safe in practice.
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby Bundaburra » Sun Mar 30, 2014 10:21 pm

If you have several appliances plugged in to a powerboard (for example, a TV, a DVD player, a video recorder and a radio), and then the powerboard is plugged in to a single wall outlet, be sure to use a powerboard where each outlet is individually switched. This means that each appliance, including all of them, can be completely turned off when not in use. Switched powerboards are a little more expensive, but are worth it in the long run.
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby lantern » Mon Mar 31, 2014 6:56 am

I discovered my Panasonic air-con consumed 48Watts on standby.
A work collogues larger Panasonic consumed 76W.
These are both now turned off.
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby Warpspeed » Mon Jun 02, 2014 4:01 pm

There are a very few items that cannot be safely abruptly switched off at the wall.
Well they can.... but only with due care and a bit of understanding.

One example I have here is a Rinnai Energy Saver natural gas space heter.
These are designed in Japan and all the complex internal microprocessor, blowers, and gas control valves are all run at 110 volts.
For the Australian market they simply fit a 240 volt to 110 volt transformer which draws about 60mA (14.5 watts) continuosly even when the heater is turned off.

The complication arises, because the on/off switch on the front simply tells the microprocessor to turn off the heating, which it obediently does.

That starts a software controlled safe shut down procedure which involves first turning off the burner, and then running both the combustion air, and room air circulating air blower fans until the heat exchanger temperature falls to a low value, as determied by multiple temperature sensors located on the heat exchanger.

If you just pull out the wall plug when the heater is going absolutely flat out, it will certainly instantly stop the gas flow to the burner.
But the stainless steel heat exchanger may then spike in temperature to a point that may threaten its life.
Rinnai warn about this in the user manual.

So unplugging things is still a very good idea, but there may be the odd circumstance where it may create a problem. The owners manual will definitely raise this issue where problem might exist.
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby Smurf1976 » Mon Jun 02, 2014 8:49 pm

Warpspeed wrote:If you just pull out the wall plug when the heater is going absolutely flat out, it will certainly instantly stop the gas flow to the burner.
But the stainless steel heat exchanger may then spike in temperature to a point that may threaten its life.
Rinnai warn about this in the user manual.


Sounds very similar to how a pellet heater works. Sure, you could just pull the plug out but then you're cutting off the forced combustion air meanwhile there are still pellets in the burn pot. The fire will go out, but with a lot of residual heat left in the heater itself (not good) and you'll smoke the glass up too.

But I can't see any reason in either case, gas or pellets, to not unplug it once it has actually cooled down and stopped operating.
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Re: Turning off power point question

Postby Warpspeed » Tue Jun 03, 2014 9:40 am

Smurf1976 wrote:But I can't see any reason in either case, gas or pellets, to not unplug it once it has actually cooled down and stopped operating.

Yes, definitely unplug it after it has cooled down and turned itself off, the power savings are significant.
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