wood burning stoves

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Re: wood burning stoves

Postby Smurf1976 » Sat Sep 04, 2010 10:03 pm

470rigby wrote:
gpigeon wrote:
and growing trees specifically for wood burning is carbon neutral.

Google might provide the answer but my goddammed PC won’t let me get that far before it crashes!

Doe anyone else have the answer?

There are certainly emissions from chainsaws, trucks to cart the wood etc to be considered.

Here in Tassie, there's a huge amount of controversy over forestry. It's a major industry certainly, and one which has an obvious impact on the environment.

Bottom line is that the "waste" wood is simply burned in the open to get rid of it, a practice that upsets a lot of people due to air pollution (these are pretty huge burnoffs, all done around the same time of year in Autumn).

By using it for firewood, I'm not causing anything to be cut or burnt that otherwise wouldn't be (apart from fuel in the truck etc). Figures I've seen on that basis put it at 0.06 kg of CO2 per kWh of heat delivered - a lot lower than coal-fired power (or gas) but more polluting than the 87% hydro and 4% wind that account for the majority of power used in Tasmania (but you could argue that the marginal source of power, a mix of gas-fired generation and imported coal-fired power from Victoria, is of course highly polluting).

In some ways I like heating with wood. A renewable fuel and it does give a nice heat. But then a point comes about this time each year when I'm absolutely fed up with all the hassle. Get home at 6pm in the dark, haul a box full of wood up the stairs, load the fire and light it, wait ages for the house to warm up. All up, I'm spending probably 50 hours a year, a full working week, messing about with heating the house. The idea of electric / gas or even wood pellets has a certain appeal in that regard that's for sure. I can certainly understand why wood heating went out of fashion decades ago, returning only after oil prices went up.

But then I already have the wood fire. And I have a mortgage that I'd rather reduce as a priority before worrying about changing the heating. And by the time Autumn comes, I'm actually looking forward to the idea of a nice blazing fire to sit in front of. Then a few months later the novelty has worn off. And so the cycle repeats...
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Re: wood burning stoves

Postby Gordon-Loomberah » Sun Sep 05, 2010 11:06 am

Smurf1976 wrote:... then a point comes about this time each year when I'm absolutely fed up with all the hassle. Get home at 6pm in the dark, haul a box full of wood up the stairs, load the fire and light it, wait ages for the house to warm up. All up, I'm spending probably 50 hours a year, a full working week, messing about with heating the house.


Its not all bad though, I quite enjoy chopping wood with an axe, and it certainly warms me up enough that by the time I have chopped a pile of it, I'm warm enough for a reasonable time before the fire warms things up ;)
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Re: wood burning stoves

Postby 470rigby » Mon Sep 06, 2010 9:15 am

I quite enjoy chopping wood with an axe, and it certainly warms me up...


...and I suspect....enough to justify opening a bottle of home brew in the depths of Winter!!!!!
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Re: wood burning stoves

Postby Gordon-Loomberah » Mon Sep 06, 2010 12:02 pm

:D
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Re: wood burning stoves

Postby Smurf1976 » Sat May 14, 2011 9:10 pm

Smurf1976 wrote:In some ways I like heating with wood. A renewable fuel and it does give a nice heat. But then a point comes about this time each year when I'm absolutely fed up with all the hassle. Get home at 6pm in the dark, haul a box full of wood up the stairs, load the fire and light it, wait ages for the house to warm up. All up, I'm spending probably 50 hours a year, a full working week, messing about with heating the house. The idea of electric / gas or even wood pellets has a certain appeal in that regard that's for sure. I can certainly understand why wood heating went out of fashion decades ago, returning only after oil prices went up.

But then I already have the wood fire. And I have a mortgage that I'd rather reduce as a priority before worrying about changing the heating. And by the time Autumn comes, I'm actually looking forward to the idea of a nice blazing fire to sit in front of. Then a few months later the novelty has worn off. And so the cycle repeats...

And here we are again. I'm quite excited to be having a nice fire going to keep me warm. Give it a few more months and I'll be complaining about all the hassle it involves, but right now I'm happy with it... :D
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Re: wood burning stoves

Postby mog » Thu May 19, 2011 6:55 pm

We're weighing up what sort of cooking/heating/hot water systems we should use.

Some information I would like but I can't find anywhere is 1) if you're using a wood burning range for cooking/hot water/heating - how much of the year is it intolerable to have the range fired up? One brand we've looked at (Esse, from UK) says it has a summer setting so that you can keep it going - but the range will still radiate 2 - 4 kW/hour. Maybe OK for UK summers but it would surely be too hot for here! We're going to be on the NSW South Coast - cool to cold nights but warmer days in winter; warm but not that many days greater than 35 in summer.

2) What volume of wood would you need to keep range providing enough hot/water and hydronic heating plus cooking? We've got a lot of black wattle (probably acacia mearnsii, I think) on the block.

3) If you did keep range going over summer is there any way of using that 2 - 4 kW/hour of radiant heat? My imagination runs to diverting the heat to a hot-house to grow pineapples...

Any experience/opinions gratefully received!
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Re: wood burning stoves

Postby cw nsw » Thu May 19, 2011 8:27 pm

mog, if it is acacia mearnsii, then it can be a bugger for chainsaws, blunts teeth very quickly and burns very fast without throwing much heat.

no experience with other wattle species, but suspect the problem may not be isolated to mearnsii.
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Re: wood burning stoves

Postby Gordon-Loomberah » Thu May 19, 2011 9:00 pm

mog wrote:3) If you did keep range going over summer is there any way of using that 2 - 4 kW/hour of radiant heat? My imagination runs to diverting the heat to a hot-house to grow pineapples...


2-4kW is 48-96kWh/day if running continuously, that's a huge amount of heat to be adding to the interior of a house in summer! You would find it pretty hard to divert it away to use outside I think... you'd probably have to surround the range with a big cowling and run some huge fans, not very practical.

I reckon a small evacuated tube hot water system would be a better idea for summer water heating. You may be able to get by with just the tubes and manifold and use the same tank as for the wetback with thermosyphon circulation with a bit of thought about where you locate the evacuated tubes.
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Re: wood burning stoves

Postby mog » Fri May 20, 2011 3:05 pm

Yes, it does sound impractical to run that sort of range for at least 2 or 3 months a year, so it might make more sense to rethink how we cook/heat/get hot water.

As far as the A.mearnsii goes, that's interesting what you say, CW. A local told me that the common name for the black wattle in our area is 'baker's wood' suggesting it would be good for running an oven. I might have the wrong 'black wattle' though - there is also A.decurrens, I think.
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Re: wood burning stoves

Postby Gordon-Loomberah » Fri May 20, 2011 3:14 pm

I know A. melanoxylon as Black Wattle or Blackwood, its common on the ranges around here, it is apparently of similar quality as Walnut, so would be used for woodworking rather than for burning.
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