D.I.Y. Double glazing.

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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby Tracker » Mon Oct 22, 2012 5:02 am

Cherokee Solar wrote:......Look, in theory what you are suggesting is possible, but in the real world it does not happen which is why embers get in to very dry roofs

I believe that was my entire point. The suggestion that double brick was the answer, just seemed a little hollow ..

I still suspect that if you incorporated all the ember exclusion techniques to two homes being double and single brick. then the results would be the same.. EMBERS .. embers. That is the enemy.

And I was also reacting to the thought of mortar exploding from a single brick home leaving it open to ember ingress
I suppose when the home is burnt out leaving. Only walls, you can speculate about lots of things ..but I would bet that the problem was not the single brick wall that let you down..

One despairs when you see homes with acrylic sky domes .... good point about evaporation coolers.. I do recall seeing them alight, and later the place was gone ..
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby Bthree » Mon Oct 22, 2012 7:51 am

Wow are we off topic here, interesting but
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby Tracker » Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:39 am

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yes - very OT..
But it's kinda consistent with the basic thread.. Double glazing is one of the risk averting methods for bush fire areas.. I would be VERY confident if I then had that CRIM-SAFE screen over the windows and doors.

If I have a flat steel roof, with rock-wool blanket under it , and just one gutter (with metal gutter-guard) and no eaves, then I would think I would be in a great position for surviving. I KNOW that I could tie a flat roof down and completely seal it to the brick work.. So how will it ever catch fire..
I'de have wool stuffed door socks for every door - including the security doors.
If I wanted verandas (and I would) then they would be steel framed and "ADDED to the outside and definitely NO gutters.. let it drain away, and use the main roof for collecting water..

I am NO fire expert, but I would really think that I could build a fire-proof home.. even if it does look like a four-sided corner-shop..

Then you could throw in the many other safety aspects like Clear Areas and Sprinklers..
Why, I would think that even if you had Evap-Cooling, you could "design" the house to keep the cooler separate and such that the air duct could be Fire-Closed.. Let it burn..!
Split Air-Cond would be better, if you had the Solar Power available to run it, and with the LOW cost of panels, now, that is even more practical..

Surely it's not rocket science..! :roll:
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby AlanC » Fri Jul 19, 2013 4:38 pm

Hi Nige,

I take a bit of an exception to your statement that the discussion on my website about Low-E (www.diydoubleglaze.com.au) is all BS.

The physics of it is quite simple even if you can't understand it. Any material will selectively transmit, reflect or absorb light depending on the wavelength. That is why red objects look red - they selectively reflect red wavelength light. Low-E glass selectively reflects long wavelength radiation. Most heat being radiated out through windows is long wavelength so Low/E glass reflects more of this light than normal glass, so it keeps the house warmer.

I agree that this doesn't prove it, but it shows that it is possible. What proves it is the WERS ratings. These are the independent ratings of performance for all windows (www.wers.net). If you go through and look at the stats for double glazed units, most suppliers of double glazing provide a clear glass version and a Low-E version. All of the Low-e windows show reduced U value over the plain glass counter part. I admit Low-E is not perfect. It does reduce solar gain. Also, it has a blue tinge when in direct sunlight (selective absorption of blue wavelength!) so you may not want them on the north side of the house. On the south side, it is all good!

Alan Cuthbertson
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby Warpspeed » Wed Jan 08, 2014 2:18 pm

Getting back on topic........

I was curious about all this double glazing stuff a few years back, have a spare bedroom that faces due west. Turned into an absolute oven during late summer afternoons.

Did some research, discovered that double glazing has two main advantages, thermal insulation, and acoustic insulation.
The optimum glass seperation is around 10mm for thermal insulation.
Any more and you start to get convection air currents between the glass sheets, any less and you don't get the insulating air barrier.
Ten millimetre spacing is about optimum.

If you do it on the inside, which is dead easy with wooden frames, there is no vacuum or need to seal the glass with putty. Just some 10mm x 10mm timber, a sheet of glass, and some small nails and you are done...
A dead easy handyman project.

Make DAMNED SURE the inside faces of both sheets of glass are absoultely scrupulously clean and free of greasy fingerprints, ask me how I know this.......

This is great for keeping rooms warm in winter, pretty damned useless for keeping out the vicious Australian sun in summer. For me it did not work for what I was trying to do, which was keeping cool in summer.

Vastly better and a 100% success was dumping all the original clear window glass, and replacing it with "solar cool" reflective glass which exceeded my wildest hopes of keeping out the heat from the late afternoon sun.
This is a weatherboard house with R2.0 rated fibreglass wall insulation, and building foil placed reflective side outward on the western wall.
Virtually all the solar heat gain was through the window.

But for a south facing window in winter, that is an entirely different problem, and double glazing should make a mighty big improvement, as will really heavy curtains.
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