D.I.Y. Double glazing.

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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby australsolarier » Sun Sep 04, 2011 11:51 am

hello,
came across this australian website, which could answer some of your questions:

http://www.diydoubleglaze.com.au/detail ... dary.shtml
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby Nige » Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:36 pm

It Lost me the moment I saw the opening diagram with "new low e-glass" so it's still propogating the bullshit the local glazing industry wants us to swallow in the form of over inflated prices.

I will have a read but my BS meter is beeping away so the eye will be extra critical.

Thanks for taking the effort though, such things are always appreciated even if I do come across as a cynical git ;-)

Ta

Nige
Last edited by Nige on Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby australsolarier » Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:51 pm

yes nige,
very positive contribution!!!!

suppose you could read it as a general guide only.
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby Nige » Sun Sep 04, 2011 11:01 pm

I am sure there will be some good snippits of information in there buried under piles of bulldust.
I was just having a laugh at the justification of low e glass, with it's miraculas covering that magicly defies the laws of physics. Aaaaaaaamazing...

I thought there were laws regarding truth in advertising?

Oh well time to look at other bits on the site. :D

Ta

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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby karlajensen » Sun Nov 13, 2011 12:47 pm

well.....
my aluminium framed windows were pretty much unsuitable due to their frame and sliding design.

Hence I went the $$$ option :shock:

PVC frames and regular performance (no lowE) glass. Each window was around $1500 including removal of the old windows and installation.

I was so happy with their noise insulating performance that I did the front door as well. (double glazed PVC) my living room which has a truly massive window and our kitchen / tv room I did the double glazed sliding door as well. In all the cost was about $11K, sure this is a significant amount of money.

The alternatives were plastic hush kits which are basically a very expensive version of your DIY double glazed windows held on with magnetic strips.

That option was about 1/2-2/3 the price of the double glazing however from a sales perspective not anything like the real McCoy...

Am I happy with them? Hell yeah! worth every cent, workmanship impeccable and all done with no fuss.

To keep out the summer Western heat rollershutters installed on the West facing windows and that nails the heat coming in problem with a small insulating value in addition to physically stopping the light hitting the glass with a foam / aluminium sandwitch.

No good for noise as they claim though.

Had we not been so close to the airport http://www.nearmap.com/?ll=-31.949606,115.952303&z=20&t=h&nmd=20110908 zoom back a couple of frames and you get the idea..

I would have attempted alternatives but as it happens being this close, noise was a huge issue and in all I've probably spent about $15K including noise insulating batts to keep it to a dull roar inside.
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby Tracker » Sun Nov 13, 2011 6:40 pm

karlajensen wrote: zoom back a couple of frames and you get the idea..


What strange roof tiles you have ? :(

I bet the taxi drivers get angry when you say "Take me home" from the airport
..
.
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby daytripper1970 » Wed Sep 26, 2012 12:44 am

[Moderator- deleted quoting of 99% of a previous posting]

feral errol wrote:I had a north facing 180 x 210cm set of 4 windows done with secondary glazing a few months ago.


Great post..... I'm desperate to do the same to my windows. Just a couple of Qs.
1. What where the acoustic differences? I have noisy neighbours and want to block out a lot of their noise (along with proper insulation); and

2. Some photos medium/close-ups would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers
Last edited by Gordon-Loomberah on Wed Sep 26, 2012 8:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: removed excessive quoting
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby jparrie » Tue Oct 02, 2012 12:17 pm

lad wrote:My understanding is that there is a vacuum between the sheets of glass.


It never ceases to amaze me the number of people that actually believe this is true. I wonder where it came from? If you think about it for a second, the pressure on a thin piece of glass would make it bend and probably crack. So, for the record, there is NO vacuum in between sheets of glass.

However, what there is, is dry air. How does it stay dry? If you look at what separates the two sheets of glass you will probably see what looks like a spacer with tiny holes in it. Inside the spacers around the edge of the glass is silica, which absorbs and holds any moisture after the edge of the double glazed panel has been sealed with a rubber mastic. So no air escapes or gets in and any moisture is held in the silica. Easy.

Being Australia, we are led to believe that making these double glazed panels is a complex, difficult and expensive task. In fact the opposite is true, it is easy as. What you do need is two sheets of cleaned glass, the spacers and rubber mastic. I have watched these things being made by hand in 5 minutes and no doubt the machine made variety are even cheaper to produce. What we lack here is a large market, simply because building standards here are crap. The star ratings here are a joke.

But I guess its easier to slap on another great big tax than go up against the building industry and their associated unions.
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby Gordon-Loomberah » Tue Oct 02, 2012 2:04 pm

jparrie wrote:So, for the record, there is NO vacuum in between sheets of glass.


Indeed, even a very low vacuum between the glass in a regular sized window would have the sheets touching in the middle- glass is quite flexible. I cant say I have heard this particular myth though, other than in this thread.
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Re: D.I.Y. Double glazing.

Postby Cherokee Solar » Tue Oct 02, 2012 9:15 pm

Hey you doubters,

Windows make a huge difference to the performance of a window during summer.

Because of the bushfire risk here, I have installed double glazed low-e windows with 5mm + 5mm toughened glass.

If you are in a very hot area, I can't recommend crimsafe shutters over windows highly enough. In the direct sun, the normal double glazed windows are quite warm to touch on the inside of the house, yet where the shutters are screening them (and they're openable for winter) the glass is cool to touch (you can still see through them too as they are a stainless steel mesh). Worth their weight in gold. The highest temperature I saw in the house last year was 26 degrees inside (with no air conditioning either), but it was well over 40 outside in the shade (and much hotter again in the direct sun).

The real culprit is that the average home owner pursues quantity (ie. large house) over quality. I rented a project brick veneer house whilst I built this place and it was always 4 degrees hotter inside than outside. Now on Black Saturday (9th February 2009), up this way it was well over 44 degrees outside in the shade and the inside of that house was unbearable and it almost did my old dog in.

Crazy stuff, yet that is what the building industry build and people demand, go figure?
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